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Population in China

ebook

China is home to a fifth of the worldÂs inhabitants. For the last several decades, this huge population has been in flux: fertility has fallen sharply, mortality has declined, and massive rural-to-urban migration is taking place. The state has played a direct role in these changes, seeing population control as an important part of its intention to modernize the country.
In this insightful new work, Nancy E. Riley argues that ChinaÂs population policies and outcomes are not simply imposed by the state onto an unresponsive citizenry, but have arisen from the social organization of China over the past sixty years. Riley demonstrates how ChinaÂs population and population policy are intertwined and interact with other social and economic features. Riley also examines the unintended consequences of state directives, including the extraordinary number of Âmissing girls, the rapid aging of the population, and an increase in inequality, particularly between rural and urban residents.
Ultimately, ChinaÂs demographic story has to be understood as a complex, multi-pieced phenomenon. This book will be essential reading for researchers and students of China and social demography, as well as non-specialists interested in the changing nature of ChinaÂs population.


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Publisher: Wiley

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780745688671
  • File size: 1549 KB
  • Release date: January 3, 2017

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9780745688671
  • File size: 1549 KB
  • Release date: December 16, 2016

Formats

OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

Languages

English

China is home to a fifth of the worldÂs inhabitants. For the last several decades, this huge population has been in flux: fertility has fallen sharply, mortality has declined, and massive rural-to-urban migration is taking place. The state has played a direct role in these changes, seeing population control as an important part of its intention to modernize the country.
In this insightful new work, Nancy E. Riley argues that ChinaÂs population policies and outcomes are not simply imposed by the state onto an unresponsive citizenry, but have arisen from the social organization of China over the past sixty years. Riley demonstrates how ChinaÂs population and population policy are intertwined and interact with other social and economic features. Riley also examines the unintended consequences of state directives, including the extraordinary number of Âmissing girls, the rapid aging of the population, and an increase in inequality, particularly between rural and urban residents.
Ultimately, ChinaÂs demographic story has to be understood as a complex, multi-pieced phenomenon. This book will be essential reading for researchers and students of China and social demography, as well as non-specialists interested in the changing nature of ChinaÂs population.


Expand title description text